All posts by Thelma Ketler

Partnership Brokers Training

 

Partnerships and collective impact initiatives are multiplying in Canada as cross-sectional collaborators come together to address complex social issues. Partnering can be highly challenging to those involved and often fall short of expectations. A successful partnership requires highly skilled individuals that have the tools and skills to facilitate cross-sectorial collaborations. Partnership Brokers Training will provide you with the insights and tools you will need to deliver positive partnering results. More information including cost, training team and criteria

HAVE YOU HEARD? – the Canada-Alberta Job Grant can help fund your training for eligible employees? Contact us for the event specific pre-filled out application form for the Job Grant and we will help you; the process is simple and quick. This course is Canada-Alberta Job Grant approved for eligible employees and makes becoming an accredited Partnership Broker completely affordable.

Apply now for this training course 

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Membership Button for ECVO Members.

Are you an ECVO Member? We have created an ECVO membership button for you to display on your website! ECVO members are a collective voice working together to empower, strengthen and sustain the regions nonprofit sector. By placing this button on your website, you’re proudly showcasing your membership to the largest nonprofit network in Edmonton.

If you’re not a member yet, sign up now! Not only will you be a part of this nonprofit collective, there are a number of perks and discounts that come with joining, too.

 

 

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HR in a Box Returns!

HR in a Box Returns this Fall! ECVO, in partnership with the Talent Pool, is delighted to bring back last fall’s HR in a Box series. Series 2 will reinforce the foundations shared in 2016 but with a problem solving focus. Case studies will be at the core of the 2017 sessions to help you implement practical solutions in your everyday HR practices.

Workforce Planning

Retention Strategies

Strategic Performance Management

HR in a Box will share best practices and innovative solutions designed to help organizations of all sizes build knowledge and capacity. A new roster of HR experts, the usage of a video reference library, and highly interactive problem solving discussions, will enable you to implement solutions rapidly and effectively.

The series will include this cycle, three dynamic sessions. Register for one session or the entire series.

HR in a Box workshop #1 – September 26, 2017 –  Workforce Planning: Aligning Business & People with Marcie Kiziak, CPHR &  Ada Tai, CPHR

In our rapidly shifting workplace, strategic workforce planning has become the buzzword in HR circles. Join us for the kick off September session of HR in a Box series to learn from HR experts how to deepen your understanding of what constitutes effective workforce planning strategy and how to implement it into your organization.

This workshop will address:

  • How to align organization goals and the right people in the right places at the right time to deliver on those goals.
  • Strategies that deliver the right mix of attraction, selection, recruitment, and onboarding that result in an agile workforce to meet the demands of our labour market.

HR in a Box workshop #2 – October 24, 2017 – Retention Strategies: One size never fits all with Claudia Verburgh, CPHR & Doug Alloway, CPHR

Retention is the major concern of organizations of all sizes and in every economic sector. In order to retain top performers, effective strategies must take into consideration the impact of future changes, new required skills sets, create appropriate career ladders, explore new succession planning methodologies.

This workshop will address:

  • Designing innovative strategies to maintain a healthy employer-employee relationship that delivers retention.
  • Efficient employee engagement strategies; what will employee engagement look like in an age where “digital employees” will co-exist with a traditional workforce?
  • The evolving critical role of succession planning particularly with the incoming impact of technological advances that will reconfigure the way we all work

HR in a Box workshop  #3 – November 28, 2017 – Strategic Performance Management: Always an Integrated Process with Julianna Cantwell, CPHR & Barb Read  

Providing effective feedback has become a dynamic and ongoing process. Employees want to see the link between what they do and the organizational goals. As new skills emerge due to new ways we all work, organizations need to revisit their performance management existing processes.

This workshop will address:

  • What is Performance Management and how to integrate it into your orgnanization?
  • What is the manager’s role and employee’s role?
  • Best Practices: before, during and after a review meeting
  • Steps of progressive discipline
  • Determine if you are paying your employees competitievly in the market
  • Discover if you have internal pay equity issues
  • Identify employee benefits that will attract, retain, and engage the rright staff to your organization

Earn CPD credits.

This series is sponsored by the Government of Alberta, CHRP Alberta, and ASET.

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Five Reasons to Sign Up for Partnership Brokers Training this Fall

By Jocelyne Daw

If you want to travel fast, travel alone. If you want to travel far, travel together” –African Proverb 

Partnership-Definition

It can be said that partnering creates a whole that is significantly greater than the sum of the individual parts, and in the process builds greater value than any one partner could achieve on their own. But what does it take to make a partnership successful? What makes some partnership successful and others not? And why is partnership broker training critical to the success of any partnership?

So what does it take?

Building partnerships is all about people. Successful partnerships are based on mutual respect and trust, open and honest communications, and require attentiveness, listening, and intuition. Partners must nurture their relationships and understand and support their partner’s needs and challenges equally as their own. But most people don’t have the training and knowledge to enable partnership success.

What could partnership training do for you and your organization?

1. It will provide “training and resources” for those engaged in the critical partnering process
Effective collaboration is not just a principle but also a process; success requires a skill and knowledge in terms of partnering processes. The Partnership Brokers course will help build insight and expertise in managing the partnering process from the earliest ‘scoping’ stage to the final ‘moving on’ phase, including the delivery of measurable benefits to all parties.

2. It will give you the ability to ask right questions
Is partnering the right approach? Is the timing right?Upon deciding to undertake a new partnership, intuition and foresight are required to discern when the circumstances and context are right—and to say no when they are not! Partnering is about allocating individual talent in order to maximize collective potential. In the early stages of Apple, Steve jobs handled marketing while his partner, Steve Wozniak, dealt with the technical processes, showing how, when facilitated correctly, partnerships bring out the best qualities in each of its members.

3. It will introduce you to boundary spanning skills
Leaders committed to partnership must have the ability to boundary span, to challenge assumptions and mindsets and to be open to new ways of conducting business. After all, building partnerships is not business as usual; it demands leaders who are willing to move outside their own comfort zone for the benefit of a bigger purpose. This challenge placed upon leaders to move towards a genuinely more collaborative model is a BIG one, and especially important within the Partnership Brokers curriculum.

4. It will embolden you with the courage to learn and the ability to be reflective
True partnerships are made up of creative risk takers. The course encourages participants to be reflective and embrace vulnerability at all costs. At their core, partnerships are relationships, and relationships are dynamic and ever changing by virtue of their deeply human makeup. Therefore, authentic and vulnerable partners have the greatest chance at becoming powerhouse partnerships (thank you Brené Brown!).

5. It will help you build a local and global network of fellow partnership brokers
This is far more than a training course, it is a vehicle for building a local and global community of practitioners that are already playing a significant part in improving and scaling multi-stakeholder partnerships and non-traditional collaboration worldwide. It will provide links to regional/national networks of partnership brokers and gives access to further resources and professional development.

Now for the logistics:

The Partnership Broker Training course is offered by the Partnership Brokers Association in collaboration with JS Daw & Associates. It is being held this October 3 – 6, 2017 in Edmonton.

 The Partnership Brokers Association is at the forefront of developing the profession of partnership brokering by setting standards, building capacity and promoting professionalism for those operating in this role.

The heart of the Association’s work is the foundation course – a 4-day intensive face-to-face training designed to: deepen understanding of the changing nature of the partnership brokering role during a typical partnering cycle; share tools, tips and techniques for effective brokering and build key partnership brokering skills.

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Stars of Alberta Volunteer Awards

Do you know an outstanding volunteer that deserves recognition? Nominate that person for a Stars of Alberta Volunteer Award! The awards are given to exemplary volunteers that have made a lasting impact on their communities. There are two awards presented in each category of: youth, adult and senior.  The ceremony takes place on Dec. 2017, which marks International Volunteer Day.

To nominate a volunteer, you will need:

  • Letter of Nomination submitted by the nominator
  • Completed Nomination Form signed by the nominee and the nominator
  • Completed Critical Information (see Nomination Form for details)
  • Completed list of references

Visit Alberta Culture and Tourism and fill out a nomination form. Forms are due September 15. 

#yegvolunteers

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What you need to know about working in the nonprofit sector

In some ways, working in the nonprofit is similar to working for a typical business: they maintain similar departments like administration, human resources and management and employees are expected to have the same skill sets as they would working for-profit. The major difference of course, is the bottom line. A nonprofit’s goal is to further their mission while a typical business aims to make a profit.

If you’re thinking about dipping your toes in the nonprofit sector, here are a few things you should know before you apply.

  1. Increased job satisfaction: Those who choose to work in the nonprofit sector are typically passionate about helping others and bettering their community. If you’re hired at an organization that’s mission you are genuinely interested in, you’ll experience immense job satisfaction when you see your hard work come to fruition. For instance, if you’ve had a hand in creating an initiative to decrease homelessness in your city, you’ll be gratified to see those numbers reduce.
  2. Your skills are transferable: Before you dismiss a nonprofit position because you don’t have experience in the sector, understand that past work or university experience is valuable to the sector. While it is useful to be knowledgeable of the sector and acquire special skills such as fundraising, capacity-building and grant-writing, nonprofit organizations operate similar to businesses and therefore, need individuals with similar skills. Do you have experience in a management or leadership role? Apply to be a volunteer manager. Are you an English or Communication major interested in working for a nonprofit? Organizations need people like you to further their message and reach their target audience.
  3. Relationships are vital: This is standard in any organization, but in the nonprofit sector, relationships are crucial to move your organization’s mission forward. Nonprofits cannot operate sufficiently if they are sequestered into their own bubble. Prepare to become familiar with those working towards similar goals, meet workers in your field you can bounce ideas off of and maintain relationships through networking events. It makes all the difference when you need help spreading your message!
  4. Be wary of burnout: Because nonprofit employees are so passionate about the cause they are working for, they often don’t know when to slow down. Employees can only work at full capacity if they’re well rested and anxiety-free. Take your vacation days, don’t come in when you’re unwell and ensure you can manage your workload.
  5. You won’t get rich: Unfortunately, this is the bad news. Nonprofits work with minimal budgets and you won’t be striking gold when working for an organization where profit isn’t the end-all-be-all. And, many nonprofits are funded by external sources (different levels of government, larger organizations, etc.) and this funding can fluctuate. Nonprofits are not averse to job and financial insecurity
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What Volunteer Managers Want you to Know

Did you know most organizations have a volunteer manager? This is often the first person you talk with at an organization. Their job among other things is to recruit, train and manage volunteers. Here’s the scoop on what volunteer managers want you to know about volunteering.

  • Screening comes first: Organizations must screen every volunteer to ensure the position is right for them and ensure volunteer safety. Processes vary for different organizations but expect to go through an interview, police check and orientation before you start a volunteer role. You can also use the screening process to see if an organization is right for you by asking questions and observing their practices.
  • Your skills and interests matter: Think of your skills and hobbies – you can utilize those in your volunteer role. If it’s not obvious how you can use your skills, talk to the volunteer manager about what you can contribute. Your interests might be the perfect match for an organization’s need.
  • The organization needs you: Every volunteer is a vital member of the organization. Being punctual and present at assigned shifts or events contributes to the success of each effort. If there’s an emergency or you’re sick, let your volunteer manager know you won’t be at your shift.
  • You’re appreciated: Volunteer managers want to recognize your contributions to the organization. They might host a volunteer appreciation event, send thank you cards or give a gift. You should participate in these events and engage with other volunteers. Your contribution matters!
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The Benefits of Volunteering and What to Expect

The Benefits of Volunteering:

 Volunteering is a way to give back to your community and impact the lives of others. The great thing about volunteering is that it also affects the life of the giver. These three benefits of volunteering may surprise you.

Health: Volunteering can have positive effects on your physical health. Volunteer Canada in their ‘Volunteering and healthy aging’ resource note that a study done of 500 volunteers over 30 years revealed only 36% of participants had a major illness compared to 52% of people who did not volunteer. Many volunteer activities involve being active and on your feet. Your physical health can get a boost just by volunteering.

Career & Professional Development: Volunteering is a great way to explore a new career path and gain valuable professional experience. Find a volunteer role where you can develop the skills you’d like to apply in your professional life. You can also list your volunteer experience on your resume to help you describe your interests and personality to a potential employer in a different way.

Social: Meeting new people can be difficult. Volunteering is a great way to make new social connections. The great thing about meeting friends while you volunteer is they probably share similar values and interests since you’re volunteering for the same organization.

These are just three examples but you never know what else volunteering might do for you, the benefits are endless!

 What to expect from organizations when applying to become a volunteer

  • Volunteer application: The first step to volunteering is usually a basic application asking for your name, contact information, availability, emergency contacts and other information that relates to the volunteer role.
  • Interview: A volunteer interview is a great way for organizations and volunteers to learn more about each other. Volunteer interviews vary between organizations, but expect them to ask your motivation for volunteering and scenario questions related to the volunteer role.
  • Police Information Check or Vulnerable Sector Check: An organization may request your information to obtain a police information check or a child welfare check. A police information check is a screening tool that gives the organization information about your past criminal record. A vulnerable sector check lets the organization know if you have a police record of posing a risk to vulnerable people. Depending on your volunteer role, you may need one or both of these checks to ensure that you, other volunteers, and the people involved with the organization are all safe.
  • Training/Orientation: Organizations provide training and orientation to teach you more about their cause, staff and what you’ll be doing in your role. Attending training is important to get started on the right foot. Many training and orientation sessions are mandatory to begin volunteering.
  • Volunteer contract: A volunteer contract is the agreement between you and the organization. The contract might include the hours you are committing to give, your responsibilities as a volunteer as well as those of the organization.
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Government of Canada suspends CASL private right of action

UPDATE:  The Government of Canada is suspending the implementation of certain provisions in Canada’s anti-spam legislation (CASL) in response to broad-based concerns raised by businesses, charities and the not-for-profit sector.

The provisions, known as private right of action, would have allowed lawsuits to be filed against individuals and organizations for alleged violations of the legislation.

The provisions were scheduled to come into force on July 1, 2017, but have now been suspended.

The Government supports a balanced approach that protects the interests of consumers while eliminating any unintended consequences for organizations that have legitimate reasons for communicating electronically with Canadians.

For that reason, the Government will ask a parliamentary committee to review the legislation, in keeping with the existing provisions of CASL.


CASL is clear as mud – at best. Knowing whether you need implied or direct consent is perplexing and a maximum $1 million dollar penalty for violation is downright frightening. So, let’s break it down and outline what your organization needs to know to be protected.

Overview

Nonprofits need to know about CASL, or Canada’s Anti-Spam Law as it applies to commercial electronic messages. These are messages intended to encourage participation in a commercial activity such as: purchase a ticket, purchase a membership, etc.

How to send a CEM

To send a CEM to a person, business or organization in Canada, you must have three things:

  1. Consent
  2. Identification information
  3. Unsubscribe Mechanism

What is consent?

You must have the recipients consent to send a CEM. It can come in the form of:

  • Express: recipient agrees to receive CEMs
  • Implied: on the basis of a relationship between sender and recipient, or action taken by recipient
  • Not required: some CEMs are exempt from CASL or the requirement to obtain consent

Express Consent

Express consent is the gold standard. For nonprofits, this could look like: a person signing up for your newsletters, or perhaps a recipient clicking “Yes, I would like to receive emails from your organization”

Implied Consent

A little tougher to decipher – Implied consent can be shown in a few different ways:

  • An existing business relationship
  • The recipient has purchased a product or service from you
  • Relationship is either ongoing or has ended not more than two years before CEM is sent (This is new starting July 1)
  • An existing non-business relationship
  • If a recipient has donated to, volunteered for or had a membership with sender
  • The sender must be a registered charity, political party – organization or candidate, club, association or voluntary organization
  • The relationship is ongoing or has ended not more than two years before CEM is sent (Again, new)

There are instances where CEMs are exempt from CASL. Here are some most related to nonprofits

  • Employees in same organization
  • Employees of different organizations about existing business relationship
  • Sent by registered charities for raising funds
  • Concerns ongoing subscription, membership or account
  • Delivering product/service preciously contracted for by recipient
  • Website Exemption – the email is listed publicly and you’re sending information related to them/their organization
  • Business Card – you have the email listed on their business card

*ID and unsubscribe mechanism included on platform

What’s changing on July 1?

It’s the end of the transition period for implied consent. Now, the general rule is: Consent is implied two years after relationship ends.

Private Right of Action See above, this has been suspended by the Government of Canada

This is the scary part. Any individual who is the victim of a CASL violation can sue the organization who has violated CASL. Before July 1, only the CRTC, OPC and Competition Bureau could prosecute. For CEM provisions, this is $200 per violation, maximum $1 million each day violation occurred. This could be bad for CEMs sent to a wide range of people. There is potential for class action lawsuits and there is potential director/officer liability. Your organization is also responsible for all violations committed by employees acting in scope of their authority.

The steps your organization should take

  • Investigate your databases – what is the basis of your consent? Who is implied and who is express?
  • Identify those relationships that will expire. Is the relationship ongoing? If the relationship ended, when did it end? Only implied consent arising from a relationship on or after July 1, 2015 (two years) will be valid
  • Implied consent can be used to obtain express consent (Express consent has no expiration)
  • Consider seeking express consent from implied recipients
  • Review your directors and officers liability insurance in the case of private right of action (This has been suspended)
  • Establish a written CASL policy
  • Keep comprehensive records
  • Implement staff training and involve senior management
  • Ask for legal advice if necessary
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